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About

This website was created and is maintained by the Schools Liaison team at Oxford Brookes University in collaboration with Magpie. The content is aimed at providing impartial and accurate information, advice and guidance about higher education in the UK.

The team are committed to widening participation in higher education by under-represented groups. To find out more about the activities we may be able to offer your school or college, please visit our website.

If you have any suggestions or feedback about the site, please email schools.liaison@brookes.ac.uk.

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Support services for your child

Letting your child out into the wider world can be a difficult process for many parents. You might feel that they are not yet ready for the potential difficulties which they might face as they make the transition into adulthood. University, however, is a great environment for this transition to take place. Not only will they be part of a cohesive community of young people all facing similar challenges, they will be members of an organisation with resources and specialised staff who are trained to address their concerns. As a result, your child will always have support and guidance while at university from a range of sources. Whether they have concerns about money, accommodation, disability, health, wellbeing, or their studies, the university will provide support to meet their needs.

Counselling services: These are offered through the student’s union or the university itself. Counsellors are trained and provide free advice and listening to students who are experiencing problems in a range of areas.

Student unions: These can offer independent and confidential advice on issues including student finance, debt, university regulations, problems with landlords or accommodation, consumer rights, and many others.

Academic issues: These can be raised with personal tutors, and lecturers, and training is often given on study skills and available resources.

Health: Some universities have their own health and dental care facilities, others have a close connection to local practitioners. It is recommended that your child registers with a doctor in advance. Information on how to do this will usually be included in the welcome pack which your child receives after accepting an offer from a university.

Disability: All universities are very keen to ensure that disability should not exclude or impair your child’s education. Many provide specialist accommodation, adapted access to facilities, as well as wide ranging support for students with learning difficulties and other complex health problems. If your child has any kind of disability, type “disability support” into the search bar on a given university’s website to find out exactly what support is available.

For more information:
Look at our support page.
Look at an example from Oxford Brookes University.
Look at other individual university websites.

Lady with student at laptop

Support services for your child

Letting your child out into the wider world can be a difficult process for many parents. You might feel that they are not yet ready for the potential difficulties which they might face as they make the transition into adulthood. University, however, is a great environment for this transition to take place. Not only will they be part of a cohesive community of young people all facing similar challenges, they will be members of an organisation with resources and specialised staff who are trained to address their concerns. As a result, your child will always have support and guidance while at university from a range of sources. Whether they have concerns about money, accommodation, disability, health, wellbeing, or their studies, the university will provide support to meet their needs.

Counselling services: These are offered through the student’s union or the university itself. Counsellors are trained and provide free advice and listening to students who are experiencing problems in a range of areas.

Student unions: These can offer independent and confidential advice on issues including student finance, debt, university regulations, problems with landlords or accommodation, consumer rights, and many others.

Academic issues: These can be raised with personal tutors, and lecturers, and training is often given on study skills and available resources.

Health: Some universities have their own health and dental care facilities, others have a close connection to local practitioners. It is recommended that your child registers with a doctor in advance. Information on how to do this will usually be included in the welcome pack which your child receives after accepting an offer from a university.

Disability: All universities are very keen to ensure that disability should not exclude or impair your child’s education. Many provide specialist accommodation, adapted access to facilities, as well as wide ranging support for students with learning difficulties and other complex health problems. If your child has any kind of disability, type “disability support” into the search bar on a given university’s website to find out exactly what support is available.

For more information:
Look at our support page.
Look at an example from Oxford Brookes University.
Look at other individual university websites.

Lady with student at laptop
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